A. Simple searching
   1. Author searching
   2. Title searching
   3. Subject searching

B. Advanced search
   1. Publication year
   2. Language
   3. Location of document
   4. Additional search fields
   5. Sorting results
   6. Downloading records to a diskette or hard drive

A. Simple searching

1. Author searching

The author search will look for personal authors, editors, corporate authors (institutions), credit and cast (for audiovisual materials).

Authors may be searched in two ways: the Browse Author Index search, and the Direct search on the main search screen. The same methods apply for both simple and advanced search.

a. Browse author index

To browse the Author Index for works by David Grattan, click Browse Author Index.

- Enter Grattan in the search box and hit Search.
- A list of authors appears, beginning with the authors that matched your search criteria.
- Select the entries you want using the checkboxes to the left of the names.

  • Grattan, D.
  • Grattan, D. W.
  • Grattan, David
  • Grattan, David W.
  • Grattan, David W., ed.
- Click on View selected authors
- The list of all publications by David Grattan in brief bibliographic format will display.

The Browse Author Index may also be used for institutions as authors (corporate authors).

To browse the Author Index for works by the Canadian Conservation Institute, click Browse Author Index.
- enter Canadian Conservation Institute in the search box and hit Search.
- A list of authors appears, beginning with the authors that matched your search criteria. - Select the entries you want using the checkboxes to the left of the names.

  • Canadian Conservation Institute
  • Canadian Conservation Institute = Institut canadien de conservation
  • Canadian Conservation Institute. Department of Canadian Heritage. Conservation Processes Research
  • Canadian Conservation Institute. Environment and Deterioration Research Division
  • Canadian Conservation Institute. Library
  • Canadian Conservation Institute. Ottawa
- Click on View selected authors
- The list of all publications by the Canadian Conservation Institute in brief bibliographic format will display.

b. Direct search

The Direct search allows you to search more than one author at a time and also to combine an author search with other field searches such as subject, title or date of publication.

Part 1: One author

Search by the authorís last name in the Last name box or by both last name and first initial. Note: the last name or [and?] initial will automatically be truncated for the search.

Example:

Last name (or institution name) First name or initial

Grattan D     

Click on Search. A list of titles by this author is displayed, 50 records at a time. Select the records you wish to view by clicking in selected boxes or Select all. Click on the page 2 and continue selecting records. When you have selected all you wish to view, click on View selected citations. You may print or download the bibliographic records you have selected at this time.

Part 2: Institution as author

If you are searching for an institution as author, enter the institution name in the Last name or institution name box.

Example:

Last name or institution name

Canadian Conservation Institute

Follow the same procedures to display records as for an individual author.

Part 3: Two authors

If you are searching for two personal authors who have jointly published, enter the last name of each author in the boxes provided.

Last name or institution name First name or initial Author 1
Grattan
Last name or institution name First name or initial Author 2
McCawley

Follow the same procedures to display records as for a search for an individual author.

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2. Title searching

The Title Search searches all of the title fields, i.e. the title of article or chapter, title of the source (journal or book), the translated title in English (if the original document is not written in English), and the title of monographic series.

To search for a title, click in the Title (all titles) search box and enter the complete title or several key words in the title. The more words you enter, the more precise the search will be. The complete title is not required. You may use an asterisk (*) to search for words sharing a common root or stem by adding an asterisk after the root, e.g. deteriorat* will search for deteriorate, deteriorates, deteriorating, deteriorates, deterioration.

You may select all words, any words or exact phrase from the drop down box to the right. - All words searches for all of the words entered in the subject search box, in any order (an AND search).
- Any words searches for any of the words entered in the box (an OR search). This increases the number of records retrieved.
- Exact phrase searches for all of the words entered in the box, in the exact order in which they have been entered in the data (adjacency searching). This is the most specific type of search.

Example:

Titles (all titles) Nature Conservation Race

You may also choose to search in only one of the specific title fields (i.e. Title of source, Title of article/chapter, Title of series). If you are certain of the title, enter the complete title and select Exact phrase from the drop down box on the right to be certain of finding the exact record. question for Vicki: do we need to tell them to select exact phrase? In some cases, if they arenít sure of the title, the all words might be better? Can we just leave this sentence out?

Example:

Title of Source The nature of conservation a race against time Exact phrase

Example:

Title of series Museum and monuments Exact phrase

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3. Subject searching

The subject search will look for subject terms in titles, subject keywords and abstracts. Because the title of each document not written in English has been provided with an English translation, and most contributors have added English keywords and English abstracts, we would recommend that you use English words to search for subject terms. If you use any other language, you will only retrieve documents written in that language. (ICCROM does enter both English and French keywords for its documents. That is the only exception).

Part 1. Searching for a subject

To search for subject terms, enter one or more words in the Subject (all subjects) box. You may select all words, any words or exact phrase from the drop down box to the right.

Example:

Subject (all subjects) paper foxing All words

Example:

Subject (all subjects) Silk deteriorat* All words

All words searches for all of the words entered in the subject search box, in any order (an AND search). If you have entered two words, this search may retrieve one of those words from a title and the second one from an abstract-- they do not have to be in the same field to be retrieved. This limits the number of records retrieved to those with both words somewhere in the record. Please note that you may use an asterisk at the end of a word to search the root and any other letters which may follow (singular and plural, for example).

Example:

Subject (all subjects) flag* banner* Any words

Any words searches for any of the words entered in the box (an OR search). This increases the number of records retrieved.

Example:

Subject (all subjects) waterlogged wood Exact phrase

Exact phrase searches for all of the words entered in the box, in the exact order in which they have been entered in the data (adjacency searching). This is the most specific type of search.

Part 2. Using both subject boxes in one search You may select Subject (all subjects) for two search boxes from the drop down list on the left. This allows the subject to be narrowed quite precisely. Select And, Or, or Not between the two subject boxes.

Example:

Subject (all subjects) mass deacidif* Exact phrase
Not
Subject (all subjects) Zinc All words

This search will retrieve citations written about mass deacidification, but not about the diethyl zinc process.

Example:

Subject (all subjects) flag* banner* Any words
And
Subject (all subjects) silk wool Any words

This will retrieve citations written about flags or banners made of silk or wool.

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B. Advanced Search

The author, title and subject searching functions in the same way in both the simple and advanced search. The advanced search allows searches to be narrowed by publication year and language, and offers searches by very specific fields such as BCIN number, volume number, issue number, location of document, publisher, etc.

An advanced search screen may be used as the main search screen, or as the refine search screen after doing a simple search.

1. Publication year

A search may be narrowed by publication year by choosing from the selection in the drop down box of later than or in, in, earlier than or in or not in. Enter the year (4 characters) after making the selection.

Example:

Later than or in 2000

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2. Language

Enter the name of the language in English in the Language box. For more than one language, enter each language in English, separated with spaces. The space is automatically interpreted as or.

Example:

english french german

This will search for publications written in either English, French or German.

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3. Location of document

Enter the acronym for the institution name which has contributed to the BCIN database. Only Art and Archaeology Technical Abstracts (AATA) cannot be searched in this field, as it is a publication, not a document location.

Example:
    CCI
    ICCROM
    SCMRE

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4. Additional search fields

The title and subject drop down boxes allow for specific title and subject fields to be searched. Here you may search Title of series, Subject geographic name -- English, for example.

There are also two drop down lists of specialized fields under the Language and Location of document. You may search by bibliographic level, patent number, shelf location, volume number, BCIN number, meeting name, publisher, etc. These may be used either for primary searches or to narrow a search with a large number of results.

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5. Sorting results

Search results are automatically sorted by date of publication in descending order so that the most current is displayed first. The sort criteria may be changed according to a number of fields including author, title of source, language, etc. The order may also be changed to ascending.

6. Downloading records to a diskette or hard drive

To download records without the embedded HTML codes, follow your Internet browser software instructions for downloading. Normally you click on File, then Save as, then give a file name (e.g. a:\demo.txt). You may save as many records as you have selected from a search.To save text from the World Wide Web and eliminate the HTML codes, always name your file with a .txt extension. Some browsers also let you select the format. Always select plain text or ASCII. There may be some additional characters which represent a graphic, but they may be edited out very easily in your saved document. Unfortunately some special characters such as accents may be lost in this process.

You may also copy records from the display using the Edit, Copy and Paste functions, transferring the text from the BCIN search page to an open word processing document.

Please note that if you are using the Netscape browser, you will need version 4.79 or higher to be able to do this.

We hope that this introduction will get you started. Please contact us if you have any questions or comments.
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